Thinking On

14 Responses

  1. Jacques says:

    Sailing with a boat you built yourself cannot be compared with sailing with a boat you bought. And this for many reasons.

    One very important for me: Let say you meet some fisherman in a place like Brasil. Well, I am pretty sure that when he knows that you built you boat, he sees you differently, from there the contact is easier.

  2. Beat Rettenmund says:

    I would caution about pronouncing a verdict about what so far is just another whirlwind of rumors. Without being associated nor sympathetic to either side of yet another builder/buyer conflict turning nasty, I would like to bring the following spin to the discussion:
    We might not be aware of what an enormous privilege it is to be able to build exclusively to our own standards. After all, if we screw up, we have all the "evidence" at hand and might even be willing to forgive the sinner, because we have an idea how it all happened and we have 100% certainty of "who did what". On the other hand once you make building boats your hopefully honorable profession and you begin building for others, you’re almost by definition up against people who don’t know much about the practicality of building, in spite of what some of them will claim. You’re working for people who have very high expectations, are not willing to personally sweat very much to make them a reality and very rarely are willing to pay generously for the extra effort that is needed to get things just right.
    Again, without having any trustworthy information and out of pure speculation from the cozy perspective of my comfortable armchair, it does seem strange that after having followed the progress of the construction of Ahmad Bin Majid close enough to provide us with a lively, well written and quite detailed documentation of it, it is only when faced with the "real beast" Creed suddenly starts to discover issues serious enough to just want to walk away from it. Is it possible that Creed is suffering from the "shock of appropriation", unaware that launching a boat is like giving birth, a painful and laborious process, where many a time you find yourself confronted not only with the limits of your practical knowledge, but with a sometimes overwhelming feeling of impotence staring at all that "new stuff" you need to get under control?
    No doubt there will be two sides of this story and the wise ones amongst us will do well in considering evidence from either point of view. Reading one of Creed’s blog entries closest to the sudden end I do remember feeling a shiver of compassion for his side, hearing about some structural weakness in the skegs that needed to be repaired, only days before the launch…
    So let me make an appeal to both sides involved here to put all the cards on the table, so we can have a deep look them, learn, make an effort to understand, with the hope that we will be able to avoid similar mishaps in the future.
    In a nutshell: Why judge from afar, when you can change from within…

  3. Adrian Honeybill says:

    Neil

    Your comments about self build are indeed true. My ‘time’ on Ateya IV proved to be so absorbing and also confidence building….I know where the weaknesses are! (there are only a couple and will be sorted this year before launch)> at the same time I know where the strengths lie, and most of these are in the design. The addition of a new rear platform, about 700mm above water level, yet cutting the rear entry height into two, whilst also provide a swim platform ( when it is warm enough!) and a dinghy area, is coming along. Work over the last two weeks has been affected by the low temperatures, as with you. It is being prefabricated at home and designed to be bolted together on site….I can send pictures, could you send me your email address again…apologies lost when I cleared the office at Christmas. As I do not have a rear netting beam I have had to go down this route out of convenience…speed of build and lack of complexity in build and use. It should work very well. In addition I have secured a pontoon mooring at Thorham Marina. Not cheap, however for me great value as I only need to walk on board….no dinghy issues getting to and from!

    Otherwise hope all is well and still want to come back to see how you are getting on.

    Best wishes

    Adrian

  4. Displaced Newfie says:

    Having lived on the lively island of Newfoundland when there was still an inshore fishery and having participated in that fishery and having built boats there as a youth there is one simple truth – if you go to sea, go to sea in a boat you’ve built yourself. When the storms come up as they inevitably will you know her strengths and weaknesses. The seaman as shipwright takes no shortcuts unless he cares not if he drowns!.

  5. Jamie Sexton says:

    The comments from Beat are very unfair to someone I know well. Creed is an enormously experienced sailor (skippered the smallest boat in the famed Round Britain and Ireland Two-handed Yacht Race, various trans-oceanic pasages, worked on North Sea fishing vessles) and has built two boats on his own out of the five he has owned. He knows very well – probably better than most – the ownership experience. The reason he was not more involved in this build was that he was diagnosed with a serious illness halfway through the build and had to trust the yard to continue on. The vessel was delivered without any of the inventory specified and very poorly finished. I know. I saw it.
    As for his willingness to pay for additional work and so on, it’s worth pointing out that money is not really a concern to a guy who led Australia’s best-know web company to a $350 million IPO during the dot.com bubble – those who know him (and many who don’t) would tell you that he is an extraordinarily fair and generous guy.

  6. Jamie Sexton says:

    It would seem that Creed is not the only one: read Warren Matthew’s perspective re HIS Tiki build at RB: http://naturalhigh-adventures.com/warren-blog/2009/2/14/why-did-natural-high-leave-thailand.html

  7. Jamie Sexton says:

    It would seem that Creed is not the only one: read Warren Matthew’s perspective re HIS Tiki build at RB: http://naturalhigh-adventures.com/warren-blog/2009/2/14/why-did-natural-high-leave-thailand.html

  8. Jamie Sexton says:

    It would seem that Creed is not the only one: read Warren Matthew’s perspective re HIS Tiki build at RB: http://naturalhigh-adventures.com/warren-blog/2009/2/14/why-did-natural-high-leave-thailand.html

  9. Jamie Sexton says:

    It would seem that Creed is not the only one: read Warren Matthew’s perspective re HIS Tiki build at RB: http://naturalhigh-adventures.com/warren-blog/2009/2/14/why-did-natural-high-leave-thailand.html

  10. Croc says:

    I was just at the "We fix Raoul’s Garbage Here" repair yard today.

    It is littered with RB boats in need of major repairs………mine being one of them.

    According to the grapevine Raoul has 14 pending cases against him and is out on a 14 million baht bail, and the Thai Judge confiscated his passport.

    Think twice or more before you give this clown any money.

    If the "Fastest Man in Thailand" (http://naturalhigh-adventures.com/warren-blog/2009/10/23/raoul-blanchettithe-fastest-man-in-thailand.html) slips over the border into Laos or Cambodia, he’ll b leaving his $100,000 toys behind.

    The guy is a crook and has cost me tens of thousands of dollars.

    He is a con man that will be your best friend up until he gets all your money. Then he’ll tell you to piss off.

    Croc

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