266 Hrs – Making Good

2 Responses

  1. tim says:

    Following closely Neil, and I can only affirm that the wisdom the group is imparting to you (i.e. "don’t worry, be happy") is powerfully sound advice and very hard difficult to impliment. It’s not life’s mistakes themselves that bring us down, but the self-flagallation they incite. Happilly, you seem to have gotten over it and moved on, as you should. I was worried about you for a little bit there. But now your hulls look beautiful, and I’m glad you’re accepting their comfort.

    For a while I was in the Middle East and had the opportunity to learn only a little bit about shopping for some gorgeous oriental carpets. It seems that if the rugmakers haven’t made any errors in the creation of a very beautiful rug, they will intentionally introduce a small dyssymetry or minor awkwardness in design. This is done to keep everything in perspective, to remind the weaver and the owner that the creation, however beautiful, is only a material thing, and while it can aspire to the divine it remains rooted in our world, i.e. it is not God. This may be even more applicable to boats, since they carry so much romantic baggage for us all. Consider the now-filled gap as Gleda’s connection from her lofty idealism to the practicality of living with flaws in a flawed world, something you and I and now she must go forth and do.

    In Atlanta this week, planning my repatriation to this crazy place called the USA. Great to follow you from afar.

  2. Thomas Nielsen says:

    Neil,
    The result of the panel not being exctly where it was designed to be is that the stern’s shape on that side will be finer than it was intended to be. Not getting the panel righ on the mark means it wasn’t bent as much as it should have been. As you fit the other panels chack for this. I have the same issue on one side of H1 – such is life! ..but when all is assembled there is so much happening it disappears.

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